Pacing and Pain

I’ve been busy, again, hence no posts. Insanely busy, in fact, and I let something get away from me: Pain Management. I know, I’ve said plenty of times here and on my other blog that PM is a lifestyle, a way of living to allow you to live. But I had a whole host of mini-handbooks to write, some mini-supplements to write and edit, a players pack to finish, and some playtesting, an inquest and its rather stressy fallout…

You get the picture.  Basically I forgot two of the major tenets of PM: pacing and distraction. And probably exercise, too, if I’m honest, but that’s not been too bad.  As a result, extreme pain, opioids, sleepless nights, breakthrough pain, the bust scenario  – if you’re into PM, you’ll know it.

So I bought a book to remind me of it, to place on my desk in front of my eyes: The Pocket Book of Pacing by Hannah Ensor.

Continue reading
Advertisements

My Little Book of Pain – moving on

I’ve been moving things round on this blog. The reason is because I am finally putting up a separate site/blog containing the extended chapters from My Little Book of Pain: A Practitioners Experience of Pain Management. Whenever more is to be done, it will be added there rather than here.

General comments and observations on Pain Management will still be placed here, of course, but any lessons from them will be carried forward into the relevant chapter in My Little Book of Pain. Some external links on pain still remain here, as does the general page on Pain Management as a lifestyle. Alternatively, an interested person can always search the ‘Pain Management’ category for relevant blog posts.

I hope those supporting or suffering from Chronic Pain will find it useful.

Only you can know what you write

I was confused and struggling with voice, something we discussed a lot at the MA in Writing Creative Non-Fiction session yesterday. I also talked about it afterwards with a few others on the course and came to a  conclusion that, in hindsight, may have seemed obvious: only you, the writer, can know the book you are writing.

Continue reading

Little bits at a time…

I was struck recently at how slow progress on First Drop was, but then realised that I’d been thrown by a number of other, smaller projects, restarting the MA (which takes me a lot of time) and playing about with Pregabalin.

On the upside, the projects have been useful and fun, ranging from writing (lots – and various), attending the local Marlborough Literary Festival (whilst the content of which was excellent, it was a show I found disability-hostile in the extreme, even being shouted at by one organiser who obviously didn’t give a monkeys about disabled people and stability on stairs), attending the monthly Hampshire Writer’s Society meetings at Winchester University (they have some really interesting guest speakers) and a Writing Group at Salisbury Library (Mondays, 10:15), and reading (also a fair bit, including attending a local reading group at Salisbury Library).

Continue reading

What’s cooking?

It might be worth saying what’s under development, what’s in the kitchen so to speak.  Like many writers, ideas just stream from the imagination and thoughts of ‘there’s a book in that’ often come to mind.  However, as always, it’s not ideas but implementation that’s the real problem: the ideas need to be filtered and what’s being worked on must be brought into focus, onto the hob or into the oven. I keep the ideas in the spice rack; the sketched and outlined in the cupboards; the ‘back burners’ on the kitchen worktop; and what’s cooking at the moment either on the hob (having to pay attention to it -maximum four rings) or in the oven (it’s bubbling and will come out soon but I only pay intermittent attention to it).

There are too many spices so they are not listed below.  However, almost everything else is. Oh, the cupboards are a bit full, too, so not everything is list there either! 🙂

Continue reading